Spanish omelette with kale

I love a traditional Spanish omelette but I couldn’t help myself and decided I needed to pack some extra health benefits to the recipe.

I’ll often whip this up on a Sunday as an easy evening meal with a salad and will reserve leftover slices for lunches. Please note this recipe is low FODMAP as the garlic is just fried in oil and then discarded.

Kale gets a lot of attention for being a ‘superfood’ and yes it does have plenty of nutrients; being a cruciferous veg it has sulphur containing compounds called glucosinolates which are great for detoxification, it’s also high in iron, calcium, magnesium and folate amongst others. Kale isn’t the tastiest on its own though but when added to this creamy Spanish omelette it works a treat!

Spanish omelette with kale

Serves 4

You’ll need:

  • 1 tbsp grated parmesan cheese (optional and stick to organic if you can)
  • 1 white potato peeled and sliced thinly
  • 3 tbsp light olive oil, 2 for frying the potato and 1 for frying the omelette
  • 1 garlic clove (slightly squashed with a knife)
  • 1 large handful of shredded kale leaves
  • 6 free-range eggs whisked
  • salt and pepper to taste (approx 1/4 tsp each)

Method:

Turn the oven on high.

Over a medium heat on the stove top, place a large frying pan and heat the oil and garlic clove and lightly fry the potato slices on both sides until cooked. Add the kale and saute gently for around 30 seconds. Allow the potato and kale to cool slightly.

Whisk the eggs, salt and pepper then combine the potato and kale to the egg mixture (discard the garlic).

Add the remaining oil to a medium sized frying pan and place over a medium heat on the stove top. Add the egg mixture then turn the heat down low and cover the pan with a lid. Cook for around 3 minutes then transfer the frying pan to the hot oven for about 5 minutes or until cooked (check every couple of minutes).

Serve immediately and enjoy with a salad or warm veggies.

Health and healing,

Meredith x

 

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Baked cauliflower

This is yum served as a side dish or tossed through a salad. Cauliflower isn’t the prettiest or tastiest vegetable on its own, but it’s a great vehicle for spices and other flavours.

Cauliflower contains compounds which offer benefits for estrogen metabolism and are shown to be protective against estrogen sensitive cancers (such as breast cancer). Turmeric is also included in this recipe which offers anti-inflammatory benefits. Tick!

Cauliflower isn’t low FODMAP but personally I don’t have any issues digesting it, so I’m happy to be including it my my repertoire of recipes!

Baked cauliflower You’ll need:

  • 1 small head of cauliflower cut in half
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 clove of garlic, pressed slightly with a knife (so it’s slightly squashed but still one piece)
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1/4 tsp pepper
  • 2 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1/4 tsp sumac

Method:

Preheat oven to a moderate heat, around 170 degrees celsius in a fan-forced oven.

In a medium frying pan heat oil over a low to medium heat then add the clove of garlic, turmeric, cumin, salt and pepper. Once fragrant (after about a minute), turn the heat off and allow to cool a little.

Rub the oil mixture and the garlic from the frying pan all over the cauliflower, discard the garlic and place cauliflower on a baking tray, sprinkle with sumac and a little more salt and place in the oven for 25-30 minutes.

Serve warm and enjoy.

Health and healing,

Meredith

 

Improve your health with self-compassion

We all know that if we have regular feelings of gratitude, compassion and kindness towards ourselves, we’re going to generally feel better than if we allow our inner-critic to dominate our thoughts and feelings.

According to Harvard practising self-compassion can improve your overall health and reduce levels of anxiety and depression.

About six months ago I learnt a technique from a psychologist that I now practise daily, it’s similar to practising gratitude but it’s more specific and I’d like to share it because it’s simple and proven to relieve anxiety and depression.

Meredith self-compassionThe practise: everyday find three positive things to say about yourself which can be said aloud, in your head, or written down.

These things can be like “earlier today I offered to make my partner a cup of tea, that was a thoughtful and kind act” or “today I went to yoga and I’m happy I took some time to look after myself”, or “I listened to my friend when she was going through a difficult time, I am a kind and supportive person”.

Even though some days it may seem insignificant or you can’t think of anything interesting to say, don’t underestimate the effects this practise can have, it takes time and like anything if you practise daily it becomes a habit, except this is a healthy habit to maintain which cultivates self-compassion and self-esteem.

Health and healing,

Meredith x

Healthy lunchbox ideas

For me, eating well means preparing most of my meals, that includes lunch. Taking home made lunches to work or school doesn’t mean boring and tasteless. It doesn’t mean you have to spend ages preparing your lunches either.

Usually on Sunday I will prepare a few dishes that I know will last a few days that I can take as leftovers. I also buy items that can keep in the fridge (or cupboard) for up to a week such as smoked salmon, cheese, salad ingredients, nuts and crackers.

I recently bought a bento box style of lunch box which I love as it has compartments that can be used for different foods.

healthy bento box
healthy lunch ideas

Here are some items I like to pack in my lunches:

  • Frittata
  • Boiled eggs
  • Smoked salmon
  • Flaked tuna
  • Leftover roast or poached chicken
  • Leftover slow cooked, shredded lamb
  • Leftover lasagne (I make a paleo style, as pictured)
  • Soup, depending on the recipe it can be a complete meal on it’s own if it has sufficient protein, fat and carbohydrates
  • Leftover stir-fry
  • Rice paper rolls or home-made sushi rolls (wrap tightly though as any air makes the rice tough)

To serve with:

  • Leftover roast veggies such as baked pumpkin (as pictured) or cauliflower
  • Chopped fresh veggies such as celery, carrot or cucumber
  • Roast vegetable salad
  • Steamed/blanched green beans or broccoli
  • Kaleslaw (shredded kale, cabbage, carrot, spring onions as pictured) with avocado, lemon and olive oil dressing (keep the dressing separate to avoid a soggy salad)
  • Chopped garden salad or Greek style salad
  • Zaalouk a delicious slow cooked vegetable dish that is almost a dip
  • Olives
  • Nuts or nut butter
  • Rice crackers (jasmine rice crackers are best with no additives)
  • A small amount of fruit such as melon or strawberries
  • Homemade dips
  • Organic goats cheese or yoghurt
  • Protein balls
  • Gummies (as pictured)
  • A small amount of chopped fruit such as melon or strawberries

Everyone’s needs for protein, fats and carbohydrates are slightly different; if you have SIBO you will probably tend to be lower carb than others, but I try to aim for my meals to be around 25% protein, 25% fats and get my carbohydrates by filling my plate with 50% of veggies.

If you’re vegan make sure you consume a combination of grains, legumes, seeds and nuts to ensure you’re getting sufficient protein and fats.

Health and healing,

Meredith x