Healthy chocolate mousse

Some Instagram friends requested this recipe so here it is; a healthy version of chocolate mousse. It’s low in sugar, contains healthy fats and protein. I like this as a filling snack or a lighter breakfast. Add as much topping as you like to make it even more filling.

 

healthy chocolate mousse

Feel free to play around with the quantities, sometimes I use a little less avocado and zucchini and add more ice which makes it lighter and fluffier.

I also use gelatin as it’s a great source of protein and helps create a lovely consistency. There are also some studies which suggest that gelatin may be helpful for gut repair (leaky gut). You could omit it from the recipe to make it vegan, but I haven’t tried that option yet.

A good tip for this recipe is to cook (preferably steam) some zucchini the night before, then pop it in the freezer so it’s ice cold, however freshly cooked zucchini will also work but try and cool it down as much as possible before using it.

Serves 1

You’ll need:

  • 1/4 avocado
  • 1/2 small zucchini chopped, steamed, then frozen or cooled
  • 1 tbsp cacao
  • 1/2 cup of coconut milk (or any other type of milk you prefer)
  • 2 drops of stevia (this can vary depending on your taste buds)
  • A handful of ice
  • 2 tsp of gelatin powder, dissolved in 1/4 cup of hot water (not boiling)
  • 6 macadamia nuts (optional)
  • 2 strawberries
  • Topping of your choice, I topped mine with strawberries and macadamia nuts

Method:

Prepare the gelatin by adding it to hot water, stir until it’s dissolved, add it and the other ingredients (except your topping) into your blender. Blend on high for around a minute.

Once the mixture is completely blended it should have a smooth, creamy consistency. Pour it into a serving bowl and add your topping.

Yours in health,

Meredith x

 

 

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Floatation therapy

I recently gave floatation therapy a try at Bliss Float.

In case you’re wondering exactly what floatation therapy is all about, it’s basically a pod (see below image) that is filled warm water and salts such as magnesium that allows you to float, the room is quiet and dark and the aim is to completely relax.

Floatation pod

Floatation therapy isn’t new and there are studies that have documented its benefits. Being a health science student, I felt the need to explore these studies myself before signing up to float and indeed there is evidence to suggest that flotation therapy can assist with stress, anxiety, pain and fatigue.

I was initially concerned with feeling claustrophobic, but I quickly realised there was no need to worry, as the pod was completely adjustable including the lid and could be left open if you didn’t want to be completely enclosed. There were soft lights that moved through the chakra colours (colours of the rainbow), if you preferred some light instead of complete sensory deprivation.

So how did I like it? At first I’ll admit it felt strange, I tried to fight the strange buoyant water and alien environment and kept checking the pod lid was open ajar (hello my friend anxiety). After about 15 minutes I noticed a shift, all my muscles relaxed and in fact I forgot they were there until I noticed some leg twitching, then I knew I was in a deeply relaxed, meditative state. I went through phases of being more alert to being more relaxed which I find normally happens in meditation. At the end when the music came on again, I knew I was very relaxed, so relaxed my body felt like jelly. Floating truly felt like a healing experience.

After I managed to drive myself home that afternoon, the effects lingered into the evening, although I experienced some nausea it passed quickly and that night I slept incredibly well. Floating is definitely something I want to do again. Now I’m over the initial strangeness of trying something new, I believe next time will be even more beneficial.

Yours in health,

Meredith x

 

SIBO, FMT, Elemental Diet and more

It’s a new year and to be honest I’m feeling happy to put 2017 behind me, I was on a mission last year – I was determined to ‘fix myself’. I did everything I could to heal my body and gut, trying everything from FMT (fecal microbiota transplant) to the elemental diet.

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First up, I had all my amalgam fillings removed. I tested positive for mercury poisoning which has been linked to all kinds of nasty side-effects, including poor gut health.

I started taking prescriptive doses of vitamins to heal from pyrrole disorder and under-methylation.

I went through another round of treatment for SIBO including rifaximin and neomycin for methane and hydrogen SIBO and another round of herbal antimicrobials, where I took Bactrex along with Allicin and Thorne SF722 undecylenic acid, I’ve also been taking Motilpro for motility. Diet-wise I was following a SIBO specific diet.

I went through FMT (fecal microbiota transplant) to get a healthy person’s gut microbiome followed by a high fibre diet.

I did two weeks of the elemental diet (Physicians Elemental Diet formula) which didn’t help, in fact my results for SIBO came back worse than I’d ever seen.

I even went away to a health retreat where I detoxed from electronic devices, caffeine and ate low FODMAP organic food.

Well did it all work? Not quite. I recently had a stool sample tested and FMT did nothing for me and the elemental diet really didn’t offer any benefits, except I learnt that I have incredibly strong willpower not to eat for two weeks.

This is all incredibly frustrating, there have been times where I felt completely defeated. The thing I learnt from last year though, was that I was putting myself under too much pressure to get better. When I was away at the health retreat, majority of my symptoms disappeared, this is a huge lesson. I think the stress I was putting myself under, just desperate to get better, may actually be contributing to the condition. As a nutritionist to-be, I’m in my second year of university and am learning how much poor health can be linked to our ‘fight or flight’ response (our sympathetic nervous system) and our mental health.

So now I’m taking the pressure off and trying not to obsess about my health. It definitely seems to help, but despite this I know that I still have a healing journey ahead of me. The good news is my endometriosis hasn’t caused any trouble for a few years now, which I’m definitely happy about.

My next step is to try the Fast Tract diet approach. If anyone else has had success with it I’d love to know, drop me a note.

Yours in health,

Meredith x